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Jayaram Krishnaswamy

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BitLocker behsving badly

This is the classic example of getting out of one problem and getting into another.

I had the virus problem (probably the ransomeware except that I did not click on any link and the threatening page did not go away after a reboot, etc.) on my Toshiba tablet with Windows 10 and decided to System Reset to clean the tablet. It went through the process and now requesting entering of a recovery key. There is a Key ID on the tablet (8 alphanumeric characters) and if I try to enter I get a basic numeric keypad like on a calculator with keys marked with only numbers.
It may work if I can enter. But how can I enter this 8 character ID using this calculator-like numeric keypad? and Drive Label with a date.



The tablet is on a Wi-Fi network with 3 other laptops (two running Windows 10 Pro and the other Windows 7 Pro)

It turns out that I am supposed to have a key and what was shown above was the KeyID (only the first part of it). The key itself is all numeric with 48 characters.

Finally I used the manage-bde commandline command to see what is going on.
Finally using manage-bde, I could find out that I have only the recovery key id without a recovery key.


What surprises me is that I never meddled with BitLocker as I do not have great secrets to guard. How come the BitLocker was locked in the first place? I toook the tablet to the Microsoft Store where they might be able to find some thing.

 It is not I don't have a key, I believe there never was one!

It is still puzzling, that since I did not lock the machine with BitLocker, who did?

According to Microsoft Store, when I signed into Microsoft Account the BitLocker by default locks it. It did not seem credible to me. I did not get the impression the technician was fully conversant with BitLocker. I avoided BitLocker for the simple reason, I did not want another layer of complexity to my files/folder that do not contain sensitive information.

One of the members of Microsoft Forum provided some background information of BitLocker's evolution. This is what might have happenned (his words):

"Earlier, Microsoft used to enable bitlocker on the home version of windows if
A a microsoft account was used
B the computer fulfilled the hardware requirements (TPM chip, instant-go compatible).
That was quite an idea... they even shot the recovery key through the network in plain text - some german IT magazine ("IX") discovered that. By now, they stopped it."

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More Stories By Jayaram Krishnaswamy

Jayaram Krishnaswamy is a technical writer, mostly writing articles that are related to the web and databases. He is the author of SQL Server Integration Services published by Packt Publishers in the UK. His book, 'Learn SQL Server Reporting Services 2008' was also published by Packt Publishers Inc, Birmingham. 3. "Microsoft SQL Azure Enterprise Application Development" (Dec 2010) was published by Packt Publishing Inc. 4. "Microsoft Visual Studio LightSwitch Business Application Development [Paperback] "(2011) was published by Packt Publishing Inc. 5. "Learning SQL Server Reporting Services 2012 [Paperback]" (June 2013) was Published by Packt Publishing Inc. Visit his blogs at: http://hodentek.blogspot.com http://hodentekHelp.blogspot.com http://hodnetekMSSS.blogspot.com http://hodnetekMobile.blogspot.com He writes articles on several topics to many sites.